​Lent with New Daylight
21 January 2019 by Cara Butowski

​Lent with New Daylight

New Daylight is the Bible Reading Fellowship’s most popular series of Bible reading notes, with many thousands of devoted subscribers. Now, for the first time, BRF is breaking new ground with a special edition of New Daylight for Lent 2019. As well as daily reflections from some of the series’ best-loved writers, Lent with New Daylight offers a range of thought-provoking discussion material for weekly Lent groups.

Helping people engage with the Bible and apply it to their lives has been central to BRF’s work from its humble beginnings at St Matthew’s Church, Brixton, in the 1920s. This new publication is designed to appeal to regular readers and newcomers alike. For those already committed to daily Bible reading, these writers – Margaret Silf, Michael Mitton, Naomi Starkey and Liz Hoare – are faithful friends; for those new to the practice, the engaging content and convenient format offers an attractive, accessible, competitively-priced introduction.

David Winter has written for New Daylight for almost 30 years: ‘I know how much many Christians value them,’ he says… ‘but a recent survey showed that most church-goers only hear the Bible when it’s read to them in church, although they admit they would like to know the Bible better. Well it won’t communicate from the bookshelf or a cupboard! Surely, it’s worth giving daily Bible reading a try, and with New Daylight I promise you it’s not a chore, but a daily delight.’

New readers of Lent with New Daylight will find themselves in good company. Debbie Thrower, team leader of BRF’s ‘The Gift of Years’ programme has read New Daylight almost without a break since her teens: ‘I like the fact that you get a sense of who these authors are: they’re people who have done their own reading and reflecting and they’re giving you the gems that they’ve culled… Very often I find their words will come back to me during the day and I’m sure this is the work of the Holy Spirit.’

And Lucy Moore, founder and team leader of BRF’s innovative Messy Church programme, explains why she’s another fan: ‘It’s something to do with refocusing against all the busy-ness of everyday life;It’s a way of saying “there’s more to life than this.”

It resets the mind to be aware that there’s an eternal dimension to life and that while the everyday matters hugely, it matters in the context of the bigger picture.’

Looking back, Lucy Moore recognizes the influence that Bible reading notes have had on her:

‘It’s… like having a group of friends that you hang out with, who you chat over things with, and you hear their opinions, and you might not think that they’re having any effect on your life, but when you do look back, you realize that hanging out with them for so long has changed your attitudes and a little bit of your character and a little bit of your ambitions. It’s like that with Bible reading notes … over time, they’ve tweaked who I am.’

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